Dai Kannon, Sendai, Japan, 330 ft, built in 1991Dai Kannon, Sendai, Japan, 330 ft, built in 1991

Guan Yu, Yuncheng, China, 262 ft, built in 2010 Guan Yu, Yuncheng, China, 262 ft, built in 2010

Christ Blessing, Manado, Indonesia, 98.5 ft, built in 2007Christ Blessing, Manado, Indonesia, 98.5 ft, built in 2007

Mother of the Fatherland, Kiev, Ukraine, 203 ft, built in 1981Mother of the Fatherland, Kiev, Ukraine, 203 ft, built in 1981

Mao Zedong, Changsha, China, 105 ft, built in 2009Mao Zedong, Changsha, China, 105 ft, built in 2009

fabricefouillet3Jibo Kannon: Kagaonsen, Japan

fabricefouillet6Ataturk Mask: Buca, Izmir, Turkey

fabricefouillet4Grand Byakue: Takazaki, Japan

fabricefouillet1Amitabha Buddha: Ushiku, Japan

fabricefouillet5Laykyun Setkyar: Monywa, Myanmar

Fascinated by the human desire to build monumental statues, photographer Fabrice Fouillet has documented some of the world’s largest statues in his photo series “Colosses.” Fouillet talks about the project in this LensCulture post.

Although hugeness is appealing and exhilarating in its own right, I was first intrigued by the human-sized desire behind these gigantic declarations. Then, I asked myself how such works could be connected to their surroundings. How can they fit in the landscapes, despite their excessive dimensions and their necessarily symbolic functions?

photos by Fabrice Fouillet

via Slate